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* ELMI Occupation Profile - Animal Scientists *
 
Animal Scientists
(O*NET 19-1011.00, SOC 19-1011)
What they do
Conduct research in the genetics, nutrition, reproduction, growth, and development of domestic farm animals.
 
Also called:
Animal Nutrition Consultant, Animal Nutritionist, Animal Scientist, Beef Cattle Specialist, Dairy Nutrition Consultant, Nutritionist, Research and Development Director (R&D Director), Research Center Partner, Research Nutritionist, Research Scientist
 
 
Wages
Wage rates not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • Biology
    Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
  • English Language
    Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Chemistry
    Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
  • Mathematics
    Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Food Production
    Knowledge of techniques and equipment for planting, growing, and harvesting food products (both plant and animal) for consumption, including storage/handling techniques.
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Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Science
    Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
  • Critical Thinking
    Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Reading Comprehension
    Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Speaking
    Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Writing
    Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
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Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Investigative
    Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Integrity
    Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Analytical Thinking
    Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
  • Dependability
    Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
  • Initiative
    Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.
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Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
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Career Video
 
Projected Employment
Projected employment not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Education and Experience:
  • Typical education needed for entry
    Bachelor's degree
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    No work experience
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    No on-the-job training
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Extensive Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (8.0 and above) - A typical worker will require over 4 years up to and including 10 years or more of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  59%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  30%
Bachelor's degree   11%
Associate's degree   0%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  0%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  0%
Less than high school diploma   0%
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Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Inductive Reasoning
    The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Oral Expression
    The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Deductive Reasoning
    The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Oral Comprehension
    The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Written Comprehension
    The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
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Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Analyzing Data or Information
    Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Getting Information
    Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge
    Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
  • Processing Information
    Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others
    Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.
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Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Research livestock management methods.
  • Develop agricultural methods.
  • Prepare scientific or technical reports or presentations.
  • Research genetic characteristics or expression.
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Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Study nutritional requirements of animals and nutritive values of animal feed materials.
  • Advise producers about improved products and techniques that could enhance their animal production efforts.
  • Develop improved practices in feeding, housing, sanitation, or parasite and disease control of animals.
  • Write up or orally communicate research findings to the scientific community, producers, and the public.
  • Study effects of management practices, processing methods, feed, or environmental conditions on quality and quantity of animal products, such as eggs and milk.
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O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 24.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor