Data & Research
UI Portal Employer Portal Claimant Portal
 
* ELMI Occupation Profile - Archeologists *
 
Archeologists
(O*NET 19-3091.02, SOC 19-3091)
What they do
Conduct research to reconstruct record of past human life and culture from human remains, artifacts, architectural features, and structures recovered through excavation, underwater recovery, or other means of discovery.
 
Also called:
Archaeologist, Associate Director, Curator, Director of Research Center, Principal Archaeologist, Project Director, Research Archaeologist
 
 
Wages
Wage rates not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Knowledge
People in this career often know a lot about:
  • History and Archeology
    Knowledge of historical events and their causes, indicators, and effects on civilizations and cultures.
  • Sociology and Anthropology
    Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.
  • English Language
    Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Geography
    Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
  • Foreign Language
    Knowledge of the structure and content of a foreign (non-English) language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition and grammar, and pronunciation.
More at O*NET
 
Skills
People in this career often have these skills:
  • Writing
    Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
  • Active Listening
    Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Reading Comprehension
    Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
  • Speaking
    Talking to others to convey information effectively.
  • Critical Thinking
    Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
More at O*NET
 
Interests
People in this career often prefer these work environments:
  • Investigative
    Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Realistic
    Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
  • Artistic
    Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
What are your interests? Take the O*NET Interest Profiler
 
Work Styles
People in this career will do well at jobs that need:
  • Attention to Detail
    Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
  • Integrity
    Job requires being honest and ethical.
  • Analytical Thinking
    Job requires analyzing information and using logic to address work-related issues and problems.
  • Persistence
    Job requires persistence in the face of obstacles.
  • Cooperation
    Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
More at O*NET
 
Other Resources
  • CareerOneStop
    resource for job seekers, students, businessess and career professionals
  • O*NET Online
    nation's primary source of occupational information
 
Related Occupations
More at O*NET
 
 
Career Video
 
Projected Employment
Projected employment not available for Vermont
but may be for the nation and other states at
CareerOneStop
 
Education and Experience:
Anthropologists and Archeologists*
  • Typical education needed for entry
    Master's degree
  • Work experience in a related occupation
    No work experience
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency
    No on-the-job training
* You're seeing information for "Anthropologists and Archeologists" because it includes "Archeologists" for which there is no information.
Based on BLS Education and Training Classifications
 
Job Zone
Extensive Preparation Needed
  • Specific Vocational Preparation Range
    (8.0 and above) - A typical worker will require over 4 years up to and including 10 years or more of training to achieve average performance in this occupation.
Based on O*Net Job Zones and SVP
 
Education Level
How much education do most people in this career have?
Education level Percent of
U.S. Workers
Doctoral or professional degree
or post-MA certificate
  48%
Master's degree or
post-BA certificate
  42%
Bachelor's degree   9%
Associate's degree   0%
Certificate or some college,
no degree
  0%
High school diploma
or equivalent
  0%
Less than high school diploma   0%
More at O*NET
 
Abilities
People in this career often have talent in:
  • Written Comprehension
    The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Oral Expression
    The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Written Expression
    The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Deductive Reasoning
    The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Inductive Reasoning
    The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
More at O*NET
 
Work Activities
In general, what you might do:
  • Analyzing Data or Information
    Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
  • Getting Information
    Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events
    Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
  • Processing Information
    Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
  • Documenting/Recording Information
    Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
More at O*NET
 
Detailed Work Activities
What you might do in a day:
  • Conduct anthropological or archaeological research.
  • Prepare scientific or technical reports or presentations.
  • Record research or operational data.
  • Advise others about environmental management or conservation.
  • Inspect condition of natural environments.
More at O*NET
 
Tasks
On the job, you would:
  • Study objects and structures recovered by excavation to identify, date, and authenticate them and to interpret their significance.
  • Research, survey, or assess sites of past societies and cultures in search of answers to specific research questions.
  • Write, present, and publish reports that record site history, methodology, and artifact analysis results, along with recommendations for conserving and interpreting findings.
  • Describe artifacts' physical properties or attributes, such as the materials from which artifacts are made and their size, shape, function, and decoration.
  • Present findings from archeological research to peers and the general public.
More at O*NET
 
O*NET in-it

This page includes information from the O*NET 24.0 Database by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license. O*NET® is a trademark of USDOL/ETA.

BLS

This page includes information produced in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics and State Occupational Projecions programs.

 
 
 
 
Vermont.gov State of Vermont Department of Labor